Norm is Back! Border City Chronicles

Layout 1Maybe you’ve heard the rumors on Entertainment Tonight, Ellen, or WKRP in Cincinatti. Perhaps you only dreamed and hoped it was true. You’ve probably been wondering what Edmond Gagnon has been up to (besides travelling) and where the heck has Norm Strom been.

Let me make it clear…they are not rumors, you haven’t been dreaming, and Ed has finally finished his latest book, Border City Chronicles. Some of you were test-readers, others voted for the title, and a few may find their names used as characters. The book is three short crime fiction stories from the Norm Strom archives.

News of this upcoming book is receiving a positive buzz on the street. Here’s a few comments about Norm’s new stories:

Baby Shay – “The challenges told in this story are heartbreaking and can make strong experienced officers unable to function. This is one story you will not be able to put down.”

Designated Hitters – “This story provides the reader with a unique insight into police work and the thoughts and emotions cops work through every day. Norm doesn’t regret retirement. After reading his story, you will understand why.”

Knock-Out – “Norm introduces Abigail Brown, a Detroit Homicide Detective. He’s her friend and confidant and relies on his expertise to provide her with a little extra help. This is an excellent story and I’m hoping to read more of her exploits in the future.”

Border City Chronicles is coming to book stores and internet sites across the world very very soon! Feel free to reserve a copy with the author now.

Same but Different

IMG_2572Let’s start with vacation vs. travel. To those inexperienced in the latter, as opposed to the former, you’ll completely understand. Others may think the two getaways are the same, but they are quite different. Vacations tend to be those one-week jaunts to somewhere warm, where you can relax and forget all about work or whatever other crap life throws at you on a daily basis.

Travelling entails extending those sojourns, not only to relax or escape every day life, but to explore new places and perhaps venture off the beaten path. Two weeks at an all-inclusive resort may sound the same as two weeks in Europe, but they are very different. So, the question is do you want everything to be the same as home? If you do then stay at home. One reason to travel is to experience something different, whether it’s the weather, or food or wine or landscape or culture.

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Campus Martius – Heart of Detroit

old“After the great fire of 1805 which destroyed most of Detroit, Judge Woodward was appointed to oversee the city’s rebuild plan to lay out the streets, squares and lots with the assistance of the best surveyors from Canada. They placed their instruments and astronomical devices on the summit of a huge stone from which they viewed the planets and meteors in order to determine “true North.” Today, we still call this the “Point of Origin,” which is located in center of Campus Martius at the junction of Woodward and Monroe. It is from this point that the City of Detroit’s coordinate system was created.

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Nine Lessons I Learned from My Father – Murray Howe

34128890Nine Lessons I Learned from My Father 
by Murray Howe

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Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Feb 23, 2018


I’ve read books about Darren McCarty, Bob Probert, and Bobby Orr so it was only natural to read about the King himself, Mr. Hockey, Gordie Howe. This book is different from his biography in that it’s written by his youngest son, Murray Howe.
It is well written story, told from the heart, more about the man than the hockey player. Trying to explain one without the other would be impossible in the case of Gordie Howe. Hockey and family were equally important to him, but even more than that Murray explains how the respect Mr. Hockey earned was a result of how he treated everyone else in the same way.
Don’t worry sports fans, there’s enough hockey action to keep you interested.

Detroit’s Dark Days

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I’m not from Detroit and this was still hard movie to watch. Maybe it’s because I’m white, or that I was a police officer. Either way this film haunts your soul, taking you to a dark place, where racism and mistrust of the police run a muck.

Although not overly graphic, this movie is not for the faint of heart. The plot takes place during the riots in Detroit. The scene in the Algiers Hotel drags on way too long, causing Cathryn so much dismay that she considered leaving the theater. It’s the part where three Detroit cops torture a group of young black males and two white females to find a gun in the hotel.

The movie tells us why and how the riot started, but then leaves us in the hotel for over an hour while we witness extreme racism and police brutality first hand. The end of the movie explains some of the aftermath and trial outcome for the events at the Algiers, but it leaves many questions unanswered. Perhaps those questions will never be answered.

Cathryn pointed out that Detroit was a movie that we didn’t need to see on the big screen, and she was right. If I wasn’t so interested in the subject matter and there was something else to see, we would have waited for the movie on Netflix.

The acting was good, but I didn’t really find the movie entertaining. Cathryn gives it a 4 and I give it a 6 out of 10.

 

Hopping Around the “D”

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Things are hoppening in Detroit. Just pop in to one of the dozens of downtown bars and sample for yourself. Cathryn and I did just that, the other day, after dropping off family at the airport. We planned on eating in Greek Town so I parked the car in the lot at the corner of Munroe and Brush. Right next to the parking lot was a place we knew as Marilyn’s on Munroe, that is now called the Firebird Tavern.

We liked the place right off the bat, with its turn-of-the-century dark wood bar and tables, and tin ceiling. Lisa greeted us at the bar, offering a list of craft beers, adding that anything local was half price during happy hour. They had a tasty selection of bottles and draft to choose from, and she happily let us sample a few before ordering.

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Tough Guy – Bob Probert

9484905Tough Guy: My Life on the Edge
by Bob Probert, Kirstie McLellan Day, Steve Yzerman (Contributor), Dani Probert (Foreword)

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Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Oct 19, 2016


Bob Probert threw a lot of punches during his hockey career, but he holds none back in his book, Tough Guy. The man partied as hard as he hit. He was feared by other players for his fighting talents, and by coaches for his alcohol and drug abuse.
Although I was never introduced to Bob Probert, I knew of him through his father – we were both police officers in Windsor, Ontario. Bob also made a name for himself when he was arrested by fellow officers I’d worked with. A buddy of mine chatted with him at the Bluesfest, just hours before he was arrested, passed out on a street corner. Oddly enough, I arrested his brother Norm on more than one occasion for public drunkenness.
Probert, revered in Windsor and Detroit, is a hockey legend and always will be. He may have earned a reputation as one of the NHL’s toughest enforcers, but he accumulated impressive stats that showed he could play the game as well.
It is truly sad that he was taken from us at such an early age, I am curious at how he would have played out the rest of his life.
Tough Guy was written by Kirstie Mclellan Day, but openly told by a guy who really was larger than life.