Road Less Traveled – Crossing America

IMG_4073Cathryn and I just completed Route 66 from Chicago to L.A. and a return trip across the United States on a more northerly route, racking up over 6,000 miles on mostly forgotten roads that were once the main arteries in America. As much as possible, we traveled the old U.S. Highway system that is still in use but often replaced by Interstate super highways.

Following Route 66 was like a cross-country scavenger hunt. We used a guidebook to seek out the old road or what’s left of it and eroding memorabilia from a time past and almost forgotten. Millennial’s have no concept of the road, and as folks our age travel to never-never land the sites and stories will disappear forever.

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Everyday People – Everywhere

IMG_2954 (1)Once again, while travelling Route 66 from Chicago to L.A., Cathryn and I have had our faith in humanity renewed. There really are friendly people left in the world, all you have to do is say hello and talk to them.

Who’d have thunk there’d be anyone willing to talk to you in a metropolis like Chicago – it’s one of those places you’re programmed to think that you can’t make eye contact with anyone for fear of them saying, “What are you looking at?” So much for preconceived ideas. Our first glaring example was at the Congress Plaza Hotel in the windy city.

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Die Trying – Lee Child

die tryingDie Trying (Jack Reacher, #2) 
by

Lee Child (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Feb 23, 2019  

 

I’ve read several of Lee Child’s Jack Reacher novels now and I can easily say this was my least favorite. It wasn’t anything in particular that stopped me from a better review and adding a star to the rating. I guess it comes down to personal taste and this story didn’t have the right flavor for me. It’s only the 2nd book in the Reacher series so perhaps it didn’t contain the ingredients I usually find palatable in Child’s writing.
The story is descent, with good characters, but the plot seemed too familiar, maybe lacking enough spice to make a great dish. It was an entertaining read that I ripped through quickly, but only because I had nothing better to do.

Tough Guy – Bob Probert

9484905Tough Guy: My Life on the Edge
by Bob Probert, Kirstie McLellan Day, Steve Yzerman (Contributor), Dani Probert (Foreword)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Oct 19, 2016


Bob Probert threw a lot of punches during his hockey career, but he holds none back in his book, Tough Guy. The man partied as hard as he hit. He was feared by other players for his fighting talents, and by coaches for his alcohol and drug abuse.
Although I was never introduced to Bob Probert, I knew of him through his father – we were both police officers in Windsor, Ontario. Bob also made a name for himself when he was arrested by fellow officers I’d worked with. A buddy of mine chatted with him at the Bluesfest, just hours before he was arrested, passed out on a street corner. Oddly enough, I arrested his brother Norm on more than one occasion for public drunkenness.
Probert, revered in Windsor and Detroit, is a hockey legend and always will be. He may have earned a reputation as one of the NHL’s toughest enforcers, but he accumulated impressive stats that showed he could play the game as well.
It is truly sad that he was taken from us at such an early age, I am curious at how he would have played out the rest of his life.
Tough Guy was written by Kirstie Mclellan Day, but openly told by a guy who really was larger than life.