Hell From the Heavens – The U.S.S. Laffey

Hell from the Heavens: The Epic Story of the USS Laffey and World War II’s Greatest Kamikaze Attack
by John F. Wukovits

Edmond Gagnon‘s review Sep 08, 2022  

An excellent read for any war buff or even those slightly interested in World War II and naval actions. Very few novels can evoke emotion from me as this book did, while the author describes the triumphs and horrors of war from the perspective of soldiers on the front lines.
Hell from the Heavens gives us a look at the every day life of sailors aboard the USS Laffey, a ship that saw action in all the major amphibious landings in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Not exactly knowing the difference between a destroyer, cruiser or battleship, I learned how powerful yet vulnerable ships like the Laffey were.
I learned just how destructive the Japanese Kamikaze pilots were on the navy and particularly to the Laffey when they were attacked by 22 of them in 80 minutes. Often wondering where I’d rather be in the military, whether in the air, sea, or on land, this story has me reconsidering my choices.
I had the pleasure of meeting the author at a local book show and he told me the book rights have been purchased and a movie is in the works with Mel Gibson and Mark Wahlberg. I can’t wait to see this story on the big screen.

Churchill’s Secret Agent – Max Ciampoli

churchillChurchill’s Secret Agent: A Novel Based on a True Story 
by Max CiampoliLinda Ciampoli

 

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Jan 12, 2018

 

Oh, sorry, I was sleeping. This is easily the most boring spy book I’ve ever tried to read. I say ‘tried’ because I gave up after 150 pages. I assumed the missions would get more exciting as the agent gained more experience, but it is not the case.
This book should be called, Churchill’s French Chef. The protagonist shares more about his daily meals than he does the dangers or intricacies of his missions. I guess that should be expected since he went on to become a chef after the war.
Not to take away from the important work that Max Ciampoli may have done during the war, I was totally disappointed in his book.