Trafficking Chen by Edmond Gagnon

My Latest Novel – Available June 1st or by Pre-order

10 books in less than 10 years. (I pat myself on the back) My latest novel, Trafficking Chen, takes readers back to Norm Strom’s working days in Street Crimes. The Detective tries to balance his personal struggles with the demands of his job.

Here is the introduction:

Human Trafficking has affected countries across the world for centuries, and continues to do so today. There are countless victims.

Trafficking Chen is the heartfelt story of one victim, Chen, a young Chinese girl taken from her family home in settlement of her father’s outstanding gambling debt. Forced into slave labor by a powerful Chinese Triad, she becomes a servant to the rich.

Chen comes of age, and must serve using her own body to satisfy her master’s sexual appetite. She becomes a prostitute and is shuffled around her own country. Eventually the Triad ships her and others like her, overseas, to Canada.  There she is sexually exploited and put to work as an exotic dancer in their chain of strip clubs.

Street Crimes Detective Norm Strom mostly investigates property-related crime, but he receives a tip from a confidential informant about illegal Asian women dancing at a local club. While trying to handle his personal issues, Strom joins a task force investigating possible human trafficking in his city.

Early Reviews:

You know those old View Master reels? You put one in the device and peer in . . . It’s a scene. You look closely and become involved with the subject. You don’t want to leave but you are compelled to click down and rotate the reel to the next image. It is related, but different and again so interesting! And so it goes, every click a new exciting scene. Trafficking Chen is like that. A story that dares you to turn the page – but you can’t look away from this engaging narrative of dark events that are written from a whiskey-tinged razor-sharp voice of experience. Real cops, real victims, real bad guys intertwined in a race that will keep you powering through. Enjoy the views! Kay T.

In his latest Norm Strom Crime novel, Trafficking Chen, author Ed Gagnon continues his winning streak of in-depth storytelling and intrigue. As a former Police Detective, Gagnon’s books offer readers an authentic insider’s view of how every day crimes – robbery, vice crimes, etc. – are committed, but more importantly, how they are solved. For fans of the main character, Det. Norm Strom, they will get a dose of reality, as his crumbling private life starts to impede his professional judgment when he begins to investigate a human trafficking case involving a local strip club. A parallel storyline shows the struggles and courage of a young 14-year-old girl, Chen Shen, who is violently taken from her Shanghai home and forced into prostitution, which leads her half way around the world to Canada . . . and onto Det. Strom’s radar.

John Schlarbaum – Author of “Abandoned -A Jennifer Malone Mystery”

The Late Show – Michael Connelly

The Late Show (Renée Ballard, #1; Harry Bosch Universe, #29)
by Michael Connelly (Goodreads Author)
Edmond Gagnon‘s review Mar 24, 2021  


I really like Michael Connelly and the unique characters he’s created over the years to carry the stories in his crime novels. I wasn’t sure about his latest, Renee Ballard, at first, but grew to understand and eventually like the new crimefighter more as the plot unfolded.


LAPD Detective Ballard is no Harry Bosch, but she is a good cop with her own style, perhaps more representative of the newer breed of crime investigator. In ‘The Late Show’ Ballard is not only challenged by the serious cases that come her way, but she has to stand up for herself and fight to regain her good reputation that was sullied by a former boss.


The story is a bit slow at first, but the intrigue and action build at a good pace. The twist thrown in near the end completely took me by surprise.
I think Renee Ballard is a good addition to Connelly’s cast of characters.

The Snowman – Jo Nesbo

The Snowman (Harry Hole, #7)
by Jo Nesbø 
Edmond Gagnon‘s reviewFeb 07, 2021 


The Snowman is the first ‘Harry Hole’ Jo Nesbo novel that I’ve read. Although a Norwegian author, he can weave a crime fiction tale with the best of them.
I had some difficulty getting into this book, and keeping things straight as the story progressed, because of all the Norwegian names of places and characters. For me, it was hard to concentrate when I couldn’t pronounce or remember most of the proper nouns that were used.
Having said that, the plot was intricately pieced together, with enough twists and turns to keep any crime reader fully engrossed.
Nesbo’s police protagonist and sadistic antagonist were equally likable, especially once the latter was eventually discovered.

Dark Sacred Night – Michael Connelly

38204691._SX318_Dark Sacred Night (Harry Bosch, #21; Renée Ballard, #2; Harry Bosch Universe, #31)
by

Michael Connelly (Goodreads Author), 
15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Feb 04, 2020


I’m a huge Harry Bosch fan and have also become a Michael Connelly fan. His writing voice is strong, his cop lingo and research into police procedure is spot on. Having been a cop myself, I can easily relate to Connelly’s other police characters as well as the creeps and criminals they pursue.
I didn’t think this novel deserved the fifth star only because the story didn’t seem to put me on the edge of my seat as his others have. I did like how the author switched perspectives, telling us the story from two different sides, both Bosch’s and Renee Ballard’s.
If you’re a Harry Bosch or Michael Connelly fan you’ll enjoy this book. If you’re new to the character or author you’ll still like the book and probably become a fan.

Cross Fire – James Patterson

crossfireCross Fire (Alex Cross, #17) 
byJames Patterson (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

May 19, 2019  
This was not my favorite Alex Cross story by any means…I’d have to go with Kiss the Girls or Along came a spider. Not to say Cross Fire is not a good novel. It was a good rainy weekend read. Maybe I like the other stories because Cross’ family wasn’t dragged into the plot so much…too familiar of a psych-thriller tale, where the protagonists family is targeted or threatened.
As far as this story goes, it moved well with lots of action to keep me turning pages and even chapters, since Patterson likes to keep them to two or three pages. The plot revolves around one particular serial killer but subplots and other serial killers make the read a bit more complicated, but fun.

A Darkness More Than Night – Michael Connelly – Harry Bosch/Terry McCaleb

darknessA Darkness More Than Night (Harry Bosch, #7; Terry McCaleb, #2; Harry Bosch Universe, #9) 
by Michael Connelly (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Mar 14, 2018  

 

I didn’t plan on reading two of Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch books back to back, but it was the next available title in the pile. I was surprised by this one and it took me a few chapters to realize it was another crossover book with one of the author’s other protagonists, Terry McCaleb, the FBI profiler. He was portrayed by Clint Eastwood in Bloodwork.
The story is mostly about McCaleb, who comes out of retirement to help police profile and track a new serial killer. Bosch appears later in the story, involved in a murder trial of his own where he says the killer confessed to him.
McCaleb and Bosch had worked together on a case in the past. Without giving away the story I can say their paths cross again in an unexpected way where one of them becomes subject of an investigation. There are a couple nice twists to keep you flipping pages.
My only disappointment was in how the ending left the two main characters, but in considering their individual personalities it was only fitting.