Suspect – Michael Robotham

Suspect (Joseph O’Loughlin, #1)
by Michael Robotham (Goodreads Author)
Edmond Gagnon‘s review Feb 17, 2021  
I had never heard of author Michael Robotham, perhaps it’s because he’s from Sydney Australia.
Regardless, I found his book, Suspect, a very good read. The protagonist is a Psychiatrist, but not a character like Alex Delaware in John Kellerman’s novels, who assists police in their investigations.

Joseph O’Loughlin may be trying to get into his patients heads, but it seems more like he needs to examine himself. By trying to get to the truth he only incriminates himself and goes from helping the police to being their number one suspect.

I found the backstory a bit heavy at times but the plot was well written and fast paced enough to keep my attention. I would definitely read this author again.

The Snowman – Jo Nesbo

The Snowman (Harry Hole, #7)
by Jo Nesbø 
Edmond Gagnon‘s reviewFeb 07, 2021 


The Snowman is the first ‘Harry Hole’ Jo Nesbo novel that I’ve read. Although a Norwegian author, he can weave a crime fiction tale with the best of them.
I had some difficulty getting into this book, and keeping things straight as the story progressed, because of all the Norwegian names of places and characters. For me, it was hard to concentrate when I couldn’t pronounce or remember most of the proper nouns that were used.
Having said that, the plot was intricately pieced together, with enough twists and turns to keep any crime reader fully engrossed.
Nesbo’s police protagonist and sadistic antagonist were equally likable, especially once the latter was eventually discovered.

The Fifth Risk – Michael Lewis

The Fifth Risk: Undoing Democracy
by Michael Lewis
Edmond Gagnon‘s review Oct 07, 2020 


This is not the type of book I normally read but the author’s name caught my attention. Michael Lewis wrote Liar’s Poker, Moneyball, The Blind Side, and The Big Short, all stories that I’ve seen as movies. And being that the Fifth Risk is about Donald Trump, I figured it was worth a read.
The book caught my interest early, tempting me with how the Donald botched his transition into the White House. The author compares past presidents Obama and Bush and how they came to office prepared, and with experts who could fill the important top positions in various departments of government.
It was no surprise to me how the businessman turned president was totally unprepared for the massive undertaking and came in with only his family and a few friends to take over one of the most powerful countries in the world.
The story is about how the president took up to six months to fill some of those jobs for departments like energy where they control unimportant things like nuclear weapons. It goes on to tell how the Donald filled positions previously held by experienced scientists with wealthy buddies who had no idea what they were getting into and no interest it what the job was all about. Scary stuff.
Lewis talks about how the president has surrounded himself with yes men and how no one is allowed to tell him anything negative. They are fired if they do.
Much of this book was dry and boring…parts where the author went into all sorts of detail and backstory about the people who were replaced by the incoming president.
If you want a scary look inside the Trump administration, The Fifth Risk is worth a read.

My Books

2020 has been an interesting year to say the least. Devastating hurricanes, huge storms with terrible flooding, massive and destructive wildfires, a global pandemic, and a U.S. Presidential debate where the candidates resorted to name-calling. God help us all as this year winds down.

For me, as an author and novelist, the year’s events and lack of travel opportunities has left me with more time to write. I recently completed my ninth book and am well into the next one. Unfortunately, those same events that have given me more free time have taken away several opportunities for me to sell books.

In considering all the indoor events that were cancelled this year I had to get creative and attend more outdoor markets and shows. With more people staying home, and away from bookstores, I noticed my online book sales have gone up.

To better accommodate my readers I re-priced all my online books, taking into consideration different currencies on sites like Amazon.com and .ca. This means savings for Canadians, who compose the bulk of my fans. All my prices for Ebooks are $2.99 or less. Paperback prices reflect page count and cost of production.

I’ve also changed the local bookstores where you can find my books, removing them from Juniper Books on Ottawa Street. PB Books on Tecumseh road appears to be closed indefinitely. All my books are now available at Story Teller Books on Ottawa Street and River Bookshop in Amherstburg.

Thank you to all my fans and readers for your support.

The Fourth Horseman – David Hagberg

The Fourth Horseman (Kirk McGarvey, #19)
by David Hagberg
Edmond Gagnon‘s reviewSep 10, 2020 


This was my first novel by David Hagberg, and although I enjoyed the overall story, I feel it’s been done to death – secret agent saves the world from nuclear destruction.
I had some difficulty starting the book, probably because of way too many characters with military or political titles to remember, not to mention the many Arabic names.
Once the story unfolded I found it very predictable, even though it was apparent the author was shooting for mystery and suspense.
The plot evolved well but didn’t have to be so complicated.
The Fourth Horseman was an okay read but I’m not running right out to find another book by this author.

Dragon Teeth – Michael Crichton

Dragon Teeth
by Michael Crichton
Edmond Gagnon‘s reviewSep 06, 2020 


This book took me completely by surprise. I’ve never read Michael Crichton, but have seen his Jurassic Park movies. I am intrigued by dinosaurs and archeology so I bought this book for something different to read.
The story is about two real life archeologists who stop at nothing to outdo each other. They head west separately, into the Badlands and Indian territory, in search of undiscovered bones. The rivalry between the two scientists include insults, trickery and other deceptions that keep the story moving and add unexpected plot twists.
What made this novel particularly interesting to me was how the story intersects with the Indian wars of the time, including colorful characters like Sitting Bull, General Custer, and Wyatt Earp, adding drama, action and suspense.
Dragon Teeth was a quick and fun read.

Cross – James Patterson

13128Cross (Alex Cross, #12)
by

James Patterson (Goodreads Author)
15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Jun 02, 2020


I love James Patterson’s Alex Cross character so it was hard not to like the book. I was a bit surprised at how fast I zipped through this and the last one I read, maybe it has something to do with the one and two page chapters.
The plot and overall story were good, as usual, but I was confused about the age of Alex’s kids and who their mother was. I had to Google the answers. It was also hard to keep track of his love interests and which job he was working, and when. Thank you Google, again.
I guess it’s my fault for not reading the series in order, I swap books with friends and read them on a whim, when I don’t feel like writing.
This book fell short of my fourth star because I thought the ending fell flat, and it was quickly laid out to tidy things up.

Four Blind Mice – James Patterson

53625Four Blind Mice (Alex Cross, #8)
by James Patterson (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

May 31, 2020


I usually like to rag about Patterson because of all the other writers who gain attention from using his name, but this story is his, and a good one.
What made the book more enjoyable for me is his protagonist, Dr. Alex Cross. I liked the character in other books he’s in, as well as a few movies based on his exploits.
The story moves well, and is a fast read with hardly any fluff. There’s just enough backstory to keep you in the loop, and the other characters added depth to the story.
The plot seemed predictable, but a couple twists kept me curious right until the end.
A truly enjoyable book.

Pegasus Descending – James Lee Burke

234490Pegasus Descending (Dave Robicheaux, #15)
by James Lee Burke

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

May 24, 2020


Crack a Dr. Pepper and get ready for a good ole down south, back bayou country story with your favorite ex-alcoholic veteran cop, Dave Robicheaux. This one’s typical Dave, acting out against the bad guys and an arrogant District Attorney at the same time.
His sidekick, Cletus Purcel, adds action, drama, and suspense, keeping Dave on his toes while trying to look out for him and his own family, which includes a three-legged racoon called Tripod.
There’s enough murder, mayhem, and built-up suspense, with a couple plot twists to keep you flipping pages in this one.
I couldn’t even finish the last James Lee Burke novel I read, probably because it lacked Dave Robicheaux.

The Jealous Kind – James Lee Burke

29326413._SY475_The Jealous Kind (Holland Family Saga, #2)
by James Lee Burke

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Apr 28, 2020


I am a fan of James Lee Burke, and have read more than a few books in his Dave Robicheaux series, but I just couldn’t get into The Jealous Kind. I started reading it a couple months ago, prior to the Covid pandemic, and found it hard to accept the new characters. The slower pace of life in the 1950’s showed through in the author’s writing and I easily lost interest in the story.
I was almost half-way through the book and made my third attempt today to finish it off. It was if I was always waiting for something to happen but nothing really did.
That’s where my opinion ends…half-way through the book. I chose not to finish it.