Story Tellers Books is Reopening!

Come on out and see me and fellow local Author Jack Bennett Sr. to get one of our new books personally autographed. We’ll be at Storytellers tomorrow (June 11th) from noon until 2pm. The store will be open for other shopping – they have a great selection of books and puzzles and other unique items.
My latest Norm Strom Crime Novel – Trafficking Chen – A tale of kidnapping and human trafficking.

Final Justice – W.E.B. Griffin

Final Justice
by W.E.B. Griffin
Edmond Gagnon‘s review Apr 30, 2021  


I had to check other reviews for this one to find out if wasn’t just me that thought it sucked. Not even sure if it was deserving of one star, I was only able to trudge my way through fifty pages. The only thing I garnered from that read was who the protagonist was.


The book is just over 500 pages, with very small font, and could have easily been less than half that. Call me silly, but I really don’t need to know things like the history of a police car or every little detail of the police department, including ranks, numbers, descriptions, etc.


I’ve complained about fluff in other novels, and haven’t read this author before, but my best description is that it is a plethora of useless facts and information that totally distract from the story – if you can figure out what exactly that is.

The Snowman – Jo Nesbo

The Snowman (Harry Hole, #7)
by Jo Nesbø 
Edmond Gagnon‘s reviewFeb 07, 2021 


The Snowman is the first ‘Harry Hole’ Jo Nesbo novel that I’ve read. Although a Norwegian author, he can weave a crime fiction tale with the best of them.
I had some difficulty getting into this book, and keeping things straight as the story progressed, because of all the Norwegian names of places and characters. For me, it was hard to concentrate when I couldn’t pronounce or remember most of the proper nouns that were used.
Having said that, the plot was intricately pieced together, with enough twists and turns to keep any crime reader fully engrossed.
Nesbo’s police protagonist and sadistic antagonist were equally likable, especially once the latter was eventually discovered.

Cross – James Patterson

13128Cross (Alex Cross, #12)
by

James Patterson (Goodreads Author)
15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Jun 02, 2020


I love James Patterson’s Alex Cross character so it was hard not to like the book. I was a bit surprised at how fast I zipped through this and the last one I read, maybe it has something to do with the one and two page chapters.
The plot and overall story were good, as usual, but I was confused about the age of Alex’s kids and who their mother was. I had to Google the answers. It was also hard to keep track of his love interests and which job he was working, and when. Thank you Google, again.
I guess it’s my fault for not reading the series in order, I swap books with friends and read them on a whim, when I don’t feel like writing.
This book fell short of my fourth star because I thought the ending fell flat, and it was quickly laid out to tidy things up.

Four Blind Mice – James Patterson

53625Four Blind Mice (Alex Cross, #8)
by James Patterson (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

May 31, 2020


I usually like to rag about Patterson because of all the other writers who gain attention from using his name, but this story is his, and a good one.
What made the book more enjoyable for me is his protagonist, Dr. Alex Cross. I liked the character in other books he’s in, as well as a few movies based on his exploits.
The story moves well, and is a fast read with hardly any fluff. There’s just enough backstory to keep you in the loop, and the other characters added depth to the story.
The plot seemed predictable, but a couple twists kept me curious right until the end.
A truly enjoyable book.

Therapy – Jonathan Kellerman

127221Therapy (Alex Delaware, #18)
by Jonathan Kellerman

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Mar 14, 2020


Anh…this Kellerman novel didn’t come close to rocking my world. I had no problem getting into it, but the plot got complicated quickly with too much conjecture and guesswork dialogue between Milo Sturgis and Alex Delaware.
The story was interesting and moved well, but I found myself skimming on more than one occasion, bypassing useless back story, and jumping ahead to something interesting. The detective work was realistic, but I think the author goes overboard by having a psychologist doing some interviewing and investigating.
I’ve read books in Kellerman’s Alex Delaware series before and found Therapy the least enjoyable of all. I’m not saying it’s not worth a read, just that I was disappointed.

Cross Fire – James Patterson

crossfireCross Fire (Alex Cross, #17) 
byJames Patterson (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

May 19, 2019  
This was not my favorite Alex Cross story by any means…I’d have to go with Kiss the Girls or Along came a spider. Not to say Cross Fire is not a good novel. It was a good rainy weekend read. Maybe I like the other stories because Cross’ family wasn’t dragged into the plot so much…too familiar of a psych-thriller tale, where the protagonists family is targeted or threatened.
As far as this story goes, it moved well with lots of action to keep me turning pages and even chapters, since Patterson likes to keep them to two or three pages. The plot revolves around one particular serial killer but subplots and other serial killers make the read a bit more complicated, but fun.

Norm is Back! Border City Chronicles

Layout 1Maybe you’ve heard the rumors on Entertainment Tonight, Ellen, or WKRP in Cincinatti. Perhaps you only dreamed and hoped it was true. You’ve probably been wondering what Edmond Gagnon has been up to (besides travelling) and where the heck has Norm Strom been.

Let me make it clear…they are not rumors, you haven’t been dreaming, and Ed has finally finished his latest book, Border City Chronicles. Some of you were test-readers, others voted for the title, and a few may find their names used as characters. The book is three short crime fiction stories from the Norm Strom archives.

News of this upcoming book is receiving a positive buzz on the street. Here’s a few comments about Norm’s new stories:

Baby Shay – “The challenges told in this story are heartbreaking and can make strong experienced officers unable to function. This is one story you will not be able to put down.”

Designated Hitters – “This story provides the reader with a unique insight into police work and the thoughts and emotions cops work through every day. Norm doesn’t regret retirement. After reading his story, you will understand why.”

Knock-Out – “Norm introduces Abigail Brown, a Detroit Homicide Detective. He’s her friend and confidant and relies on his expertise to provide her with a little extra help. This is an excellent story and I’m hoping to read more of her exploits in the future.”

Border City Chronicles is coming to book stores and internet sites across the world very very soon! Feel free to reserve a copy with the author now.

The Race – Clive Cussler – Isaac Bell Series

the raceThe Race (Isaac Bell, #4) 
by Clive CusslerJustin Scott (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Mar 07, 2018  

 

This makes two Clive Cussler novels in a row that I’ve read, but this one was the last book left in the pile that was left here at the apartment in Mexico. I like the Isaac Bell Detective series, but found this book was a cookie cutter version of the last one I read. The good guy chases the bad guy, almost catches his two or three times, gets a little banged up on the way, then gets the girl and lives happily ever after. The names of the characters have been changed.
Need I say more? Okay, in fairness it is a good read and a bit different than all the other crime fiction stuff out there in that the story is about the birth of aviation and a race across America to see who has the best machine.

Swan Peak – James Lee Burke

Swan peakSwan Peak (Dave Robicheaux, #17) 
by James Lee Burke

 

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Dec 24, 2017  
Dave Robicheaux is one of my favorite characters, perhaps because I can relate to him so easily. James Lee Burke is master of metaphors and he can offer descriptions of the sky like no other. His story-telling is enjoyable and almost philosophical at times.
In this book Burke’s first hand knowledge of the pristine scenery in Northern Montana shines above his usual inside look at Louisiana bayou country. Robicheaux’s sidekick Clete Purcel is also a colorful and easily likable character.
The only reason I didn’t give this book a fifth star is that it wasn’t as exciting as other Burke novels I’ve read.