Suspect – Michael Robotham

Suspect (Joseph O’Loughlin, #1)
by Michael Robotham (Goodreads Author)
Edmond Gagnon‘s review Feb 17, 2021  
I had never heard of author Michael Robotham, perhaps it’s because he’s from Sydney Australia.
Regardless, I found his book, Suspect, a very good read. The protagonist is a Psychiatrist, but not a character like Alex Delaware in John Kellerman’s novels, who assists police in their investigations.

Joseph O’Loughlin may be trying to get into his patients heads, but it seems more like he needs to examine himself. By trying to get to the truth he only incriminates himself and goes from helping the police to being their number one suspect.

I found the backstory a bit heavy at times but the plot was well written and fast paced enough to keep my attention. I would definitely read this author again.

The Snowman – Jo Nesbo

The Snowman (Harry Hole, #7)
by Jo Nesbø 
Edmond Gagnon‘s reviewFeb 07, 2021 


The Snowman is the first ‘Harry Hole’ Jo Nesbo novel that I’ve read. Although a Norwegian author, he can weave a crime fiction tale with the best of them.
I had some difficulty getting into this book, and keeping things straight as the story progressed, because of all the Norwegian names of places and characters. For me, it was hard to concentrate when I couldn’t pronounce or remember most of the proper nouns that were used.
Having said that, the plot was intricately pieced together, with enough twists and turns to keep any crime reader fully engrossed.
Nesbo’s police protagonist and sadistic antagonist were equally likable, especially once the latter was eventually discovered.

Cross – James Patterson

13128Cross (Alex Cross, #12)
by

James Patterson (Goodreads Author)
15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Jun 02, 2020


I love James Patterson’s Alex Cross character so it was hard not to like the book. I was a bit surprised at how fast I zipped through this and the last one I read, maybe it has something to do with the one and two page chapters.
The plot and overall story were good, as usual, but I was confused about the age of Alex’s kids and who their mother was. I had to Google the answers. It was also hard to keep track of his love interests and which job he was working, and when. Thank you Google, again.
I guess it’s my fault for not reading the series in order, I swap books with friends and read them on a whim, when I don’t feel like writing.
This book fell short of my fourth star because I thought the ending fell flat, and it was quickly laid out to tidy things up.

Four Blind Mice – James Patterson

53625Four Blind Mice (Alex Cross, #8)
by James Patterson (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

May 31, 2020


I usually like to rag about Patterson because of all the other writers who gain attention from using his name, but this story is his, and a good one.
What made the book more enjoyable for me is his protagonist, Dr. Alex Cross. I liked the character in other books he’s in, as well as a few movies based on his exploits.
The story moves well, and is a fast read with hardly any fluff. There’s just enough backstory to keep you in the loop, and the other characters added depth to the story.
The plot seemed predictable, but a couple twists kept me curious right until the end.
A truly enjoyable book.

Pegasus Descending – James Lee Burke

234490Pegasus Descending (Dave Robicheaux, #15)
by James Lee Burke

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

May 24, 2020


Crack a Dr. Pepper and get ready for a good ole down south, back bayou country story with your favorite ex-alcoholic veteran cop, Dave Robicheaux. This one’s typical Dave, acting out against the bad guys and an arrogant District Attorney at the same time.
His sidekick, Cletus Purcel, adds action, drama, and suspense, keeping Dave on his toes while trying to look out for him and his own family, which includes a three-legged racoon called Tripod.
There’s enough murder, mayhem, and built-up suspense, with a couple plot twists to keep you flipping pages in this one.
I couldn’t even finish the last James Lee Burke novel I read, probably because it lacked Dave Robicheaux.

Jack Reacher – Midnight Line – Lee Child

33378951The Midnight Line (Jack Reacher, #22)
by Lee Child (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Mar 18, 2020


I think this book only deserves three and a half stars, but that’s not allowed and I went to four because it’s hard not to like Jack Reacher. My problem was I felt this story fell short in the pace and action categories that usually make a Reacher novel great. I thought it lagged through the middle and the author got a bit carried away with repeating the same incidents, through the different character’s perspectives.
The plot was still good, although predictable and much tamer than other Reacher novels I read, but if you’re a fan it’s still a good read and I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

Therapy – Jonathan Kellerman

127221Therapy (Alex Delaware, #18)
by Jonathan Kellerman

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Mar 14, 2020


Anh…this Kellerman novel didn’t come close to rocking my world. I had no problem getting into it, but the plot got complicated quickly with too much conjecture and guesswork dialogue between Milo Sturgis and Alex Delaware.
The story was interesting and moved well, but I found myself skimming on more than one occasion, bypassing useless back story, and jumping ahead to something interesting. The detective work was realistic, but I think the author goes overboard by having a psychologist doing some interviewing and investigating.
I’ve read books in Kellerman’s Alex Delaware series before and found Therapy the least enjoyable of all. I’m not saying it’s not worth a read, just that I was disappointed.

Murder in Montana – Anna Schilke

23767009Murder in Montana
by Anna Schilke (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Mar 01, 2020


I didn’t finish reading this book and struggled to give it three stars, but it was a descent story that touched on some serious issues with regard to the abuse of women. Maybe I’m biased because I’m a former police detective, but I thought the investigative and police procedural parts of the book fell flat.
The author came up with a truly unique MO for her serial killer and that peaked my curiosity, but even that wasn’t enough to coax me into finishing the book. I think overall, it lacked the polish that a good editor could have brought into the mix.
I met this author at a book fair and swapped one of my own for hers. She’d told me there was a story to go along with the novel but I never got to hear it. In what I did read, I think that she had some personal experiences in her past that inspired her to put her thoughts to paper.
In all, the book was a good effort but it think it fell short of its mark.

Dark Sacred Night – Michael Connelly

38204691._SX318_Dark Sacred Night (Harry Bosch, #21; Renée Ballard, #2; Harry Bosch Universe, #31)
by

Michael Connelly (Goodreads Author), 
15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Feb 04, 2020


I’m a huge Harry Bosch fan and have also become a Michael Connelly fan. His writing voice is strong, his cop lingo and research into police procedure is spot on. Having been a cop myself, I can easily relate to Connelly’s other police characters as well as the creeps and criminals they pursue.
I didn’t think this novel deserved the fifth star only because the story didn’t seem to put me on the edge of my seat as his others have. I did like how the author switched perspectives, telling us the story from two different sides, both Bosch’s and Renee Ballard’s.
If you’re a Harry Bosch or Michael Connelly fan you’ll enjoy this book. If you’re new to the character or author you’ll still like the book and probably become a fan.

Saving Faith – David Baldacci

15157Saving Faith
by

David Baldacci (Goodreads Author)
15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Jan 19, 2020


I’ve read much better by Baldacci and was disappointed that I had a hard time getting into this novel. Admittedly, some stories are difficult that way, trying to understand the plot and the introduction of new characters. In this case, I found way too much fluff and back story, to the point that I had to skim ahead through the first quarter of the book.
Granted, some history and back story go to character development, but I don’t believe we need to know how a certain character behaved in grade school if it has nothing to do with the overall plot. Having said that, I found the characters in Saving Faith likeable. And having said that, personally, I found some of their actions and dialogue a bit sappy and unlikely in the real world.
Maybe I’m being a bit critical but that is what reviews are all about. Baldacci acknowledges certain professionals who aided him in his research and the writing of this book. If that’s the case then I have to wonder if perhaps they were holding back or what world they are living in. I see the book was written in 1999 and I know for a fact the world was not such a gentile place back then.
The book does get better in the second half, but with the exception of one nice twist, it was very predictable.