Hide and Seek – James Patterson

13153Hide and Seek 
by James Patterson (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Feb 06, 2019  


It was nice to read a novel that was actually written by Patterson himself, before he started publishing underlings with cookie-cutter stories. I’d forgotten that the man can weave a good tale.
Hide and Seek is a murder/mystery story that moves along at a good pace with plenty of twists and turns to keep you interested.
The different points of view bring you closer to the characters and let you inside ‘their’ story.
I liked the main character and it was easy to root for her throughout the book, whether she was guilty or not.
Hide and Seek is a good book and easy read.

Bill Bryson – Neither Here Nor There

27Neither Here nor There: Travels in Europe

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Jan 28, 2019  


I’ve known about Bill Bryson for some time and saw a movie about his last travel adventure, but had never got around to reading any of his material. I had ‘Neither Here Nor There’ collecting dust at home with my two shelves of other books to read, and since I was about to leave on a travel adventure myself, I took Bill’s book along to pass the down time when not engaged in sightseeing, eating or drinking.
Having traveled solo like Bryson did in this book, I can truly appreciate his adventures and misadventures in an era before the internet, cell phones, and GPS. Like him, I still love unfolding a map to plan the next day’s route. Bryson is the type of person who is comfortable in his own skin and has no qualms about travelling alone.
He is a good writer, with a sarcastic sense of humor, and an unquenchable thirst for metaphors. The book is more of a collection of snippets from the various cities and towns along his route. He likes to pound the pavement and sit in local watering holes or cafes to get a good feel of each and every place his visits.
Being the author of my own travel book, with some similarities, I generally liked the read, but found it a bit awkward at times – especially when the author went off on one of his rants. His American arrogance toward the rest of the world showed through on more than one occasion. I’m not saying that Mr. Bryson is predjudice against all foreigners, from what I’ve experienced in my travels it’s just the way some Americans are. They love to travel, but expect everything, like food, to be the same as home.

The Target – David Baldacci

18353714The Target (Will Robie, #3) 
by David Baldacci (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Mar 27, 2018  ·


I haven’t read a lot of Baldacci, but I can say this book was my least favorite so far. The two protagonists were cookie-cutter type American super spies who save the world with their every breath. I felt the story steered too far away from the main plot with the introduction of sub-plots that really didn’t add much depth to the overall story.
In my opinion the author went overboard in describing the miserable life the antagonist had in a North Korean prison. I’m not squeamish by any means, I just tired of the to-numerous descriptions of human torture and degradation.
The story moves along quickly and is not a bad read, if you’re into a mindless thriller.

A Darkness More Than Night – Michael Connelly – Harry Bosch/Terry McCaleb

76867A Darkness More Than Night (Harry Bosch, #7; Terry McCaleb, #2; Harry Bosch Universe, #9) 
by Michael Connelly (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Mar 14, 2018  


I didn’t plan on reading two of Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch books back to back, but it was the next available title in the pile. I was surprised by this one and it took me a few chapters to realize it was another crossover book with one of the author’s other protagonists, Terry McCaleb, the FBI profiler. He was portrayed by Clint Eastwood in Bloodwork.
The story is mostly about McCaleb, who comes out of retirement to help police profile and track a new serial killer. Bosch appears later in the story, involved in a murder trial of his own where he says the killer confessed to him.
McCaleb and Bosch had worked together on a case in the past. Without giving away the story I can say their paths cross again in an unexpected way where one of them becomes subject of an investigation. There are a couple nice twists to keep you flipping pages.
My only disappointment was in how the ending left the two main characters, but in considering their individual personalities it was only fitting.

Clive Cussler – The Gangster

25776200The Gangster (Isaac Bell, #9) 
by Clive CusslerJustin Scott (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Feb 28, 2018  


I’d lost interest in author Clive Cussler’s work some time ago, and can’t remember why, maybe it’s because he’s another of those successful authors who has underlings writing for him, using his name to sell books.
Regardless, I truly enjoyed The Gangster, an Isaac Bell Adventure. The plot was fresh, although the story is set just after the turn of the century, in and around New York City. Irish and Italian gangs were responsible for much of the city’s crime, but also for building its infrastructure, like the giant aqueduct that is being built to bring a thirsty city fresh water from two hundred miles away, in the Catskills.
Isaac Bell is a Van Horn Detective, a private investigation company in the east, like the Pinkerton’s were to the west. The book is a good read and I’m sure I’ll pick up another in the series if I see one.

The Whistler – John Grisham

29354916The Whistler 
by John Grisham (Goodreads Author)

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Jan 09, 2018  


This book was a great read and a nice surprise, from John Grisham. No usual courtroom drama, just a steady pace of crime investigation by an unknown agency who investigates corrupt or crooked judges. The story is full of suspense, with some good action and strong characters who are portrayed as real people. The plot revolves around a criminal enterprise and skimming operation at an Indian casino. I recommend this book to any crime fiction or thriller fan.

Raylan – Elmore Leonard

12037108Raylan
by Elmore Leonard

15204490

Edmond Gagnon‘s review

Jun 18, 2017


I’ve seen many of the movies made from Elmore Leonard’s books, but this is the first novel of his I’ve read. Apparently there’s also a television series of the same name, Raylan.
Although the U.S. Marshal of the same name is a no-nonsense shoot first ask questions later kind of lawman, he is a smart cop who’s mind is quicker than the coal country hillbilly drawl that can be a bit difficult to read. The fun part is that I found myself sounding out the slang in my head.
Actually, I’d rate this book at 3.5 stars. It was a good read, but maybe too predictable at times. Raylan says that life and folks are different in the Kentucky mountains. So is this book. R.I.P. Elmore Leonard.